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Perna, Laura – New Directions for Higher Education, 2005
Institutional leaders should consider the consequences of policies, practices, and social forces that force women to choose between work and family. (Contains 2 tables.)
Descriptors: Family Work Relationship, Women Faculty, Higher Education, Gender Differences
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Conley, Valerie Martin – New Directions for Higher Education, 2005
If career experiences of women academics are significantly different from those of men, analysts of gender equity need to take those differences into account. (Contains 6 tables.)
Descriptors: Women Faculty, College Faculty, Higher Education, Gender Differences
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Leslie, David W. – New Directions for Higher Education, 2005
Faculty now have the task of using retirement options creatively, and institutions, of finding common purpose with faculty.
Descriptors: College Faculty, Retirement, Developmental Stages, Age Differences
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Conley, Valerie Martin – New Directions for Higher Education, 2005
Late-career decisions are made by faculty who vary widely in career achievement, personal circumstances, and now, retirement patterns. (Contains 10 tables.)
Descriptors: Teacher Retirement, College Faculty, Retirement, Community Colleges
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Leslie, David W. – New Directions for Higher Education, 2005
Individuals who retire have widely varying needs and differ also in their preparedness for their new conditions.
Descriptors: Retirement, College Faculty, Individual Differences, Educational Policy
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Davis, Russell G. – New Directions for Higher Education, 1976
A cross-cultural perspective on education's response to labor market demands is offered that emphasizes the role of postsecondary nonformal education. (LBH)
Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Educational Needs, Employment Patterns, Higher Education
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Salters, Roger E. – New Directions for Higher Education, 1997
Doctoral education in science and engineering has changed with shifts in demand for doctorates, increased minority and women's participation, patterns of financing graduate study, and employment of doctoral recipients. It must continue to change by attracting and encouraging women and other underrepresented groups. Initiatives to date include:…
Descriptors: Doctoral Degrees, Doctoral Programs, Educational Change, Educational Trends
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Holden, Karen C.; Hansen, W. Lee – New Directions for Higher Education, 1989
A study of the historical connection between pension, mandatory retirement age, and retirement behavior in higher education suggests that raising the mandatory retirement age from 65 to 70 will have relatively small, short-term effects on the retirement timing of tenured faculty members. (Author/MSE)
Descriptors: Aging in Academia, College Faculty, Employment Patterns, Federal Legislation
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Burkhauser, Richard V.; Quinn, Joseph F. – New Directions for Higher Education, 1989
An analysis of the impact of increasing the minimum mandatory retirement age on the retirement patterns of older adults across the entire economy suggests that because of the strong disincentives to work embedded in social security and many employee pensions, most workers will continue to retire in their early sixties. (MSE)
Descriptors: College Faculty, Comparative Analysis, Employment Patterns, Federal Legislation
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Holden, Karen C.; Hansen, W. Lee – New Directions for Higher Education, 1989
Uncapping the mandatory retirement age is unlikely to alter retirement age by much, but it will lead to substantially higher pensions for faculty members who continue to work. Institutions must monitor retirement-age behavior in order to restructure pension and other benefits appropriately to meet income and retirement objectives. (Author/MSE)
Descriptors: Aging in Academia, College Faculty, Employment Patterns, Federal Legislation
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Ruebhausen, Oscar M. – New Directions for Higher Education, 1989
Tenure arrangements are long-term contracts. If their duration is clear, they will protect academic freedom, provide institutions with the flexibility needed to meet changing circumstances, and comply with age-discrimination laws. Policy for the termination of tenure must be redesigned to satisfy competing needs and goals. (Author/MSE)
Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Age Discrimination, Aging in Academia, College Faculty