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ERIC Number: ED591441
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2019-Jan-10
Pages: 39
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: EISSN-
Recent Developments on Related Studies of the "Mozart Effect" Phenomenon on Social Learning Behavior
Pelayo, Jose Maria G., III.
Online Submission
After a five (5) day observation period and successfully documenting the current dynamics of high students in the academic and social settings before the exposure to Mozart's music, the researcher continues with a twenty (20) day observation period of the same participants in their respective environments while exposed to Mozart's music. Before the exposure to Mozart's music, the dynamics of High School students in the Academic setting, during the five (5) day observation period, has shown to have a minimal number of students displaying behavior leading to learning. Presented are the averages of the observed behavior of High School students before the exposure to Mozart's music. On the other hand, the dynamics of High School students in the Social setting, during the five (5) day observation period, many students have not shown behavior leading to social interaction. Presented are the averages of the observed behavior of High School students before the exposure to Mozart's music. However, after the exposure to Mozart's music, in the academic setting, during the exposure to Mozart's music for a period of twenty (20) days, there was an increase in percentages from Day 16 to Day 20. Every student was eliciting two (2) or more behaviors leading to learning. In comparison to Day 1 to Day 15, the last five (5) days, Day 16 to Day 20, showed very high percentages of students that showed behavior leading to learning. To further illustrate the high percentages of students that showed behavior leading to learning during the Day 16 to Day 20, the following data is presented representing the averages of the percentage of students that showed behavior leading to learning during this time frame. The students cited that while they were listening to Mozart's music, they discovered that they could read and study at the same time, the music did not distract them while they were reading or studying. Some students have cited that when they were reviewing or studying their lessons in the past, they were bored and spent little time reviewing or studying. But other students stated that Mozart's music made them enjoy reading and studying because they were not bored. Some students claim that Mozart's music made them feel they could do new things, it inspired them to try to learn how to play chess, to answer the crossword puzzle and to solve the Rubik's Cube. They cited that when they watch students playing chess, answering the crossword puzzle and solving the Rubik's Cube, the music inspired them to play, answer and solve too. One particular student said that, somehow, while listening to Mozart's music and watching other students play, answer and solve, it looked easy and enjoying. While students play, answer and solve the materials, Mozart's music made them nod their heads, wave their hands and tap their feet to the highs and lows of the music. This scenario projected a positive image on other students who were watching them, it made learning to play chess, answering the crossword puzzle and solving the Rubik's Cube easy and delightful, many students also agreed. That is why this particular student tried to learn to play chess, tried to answer the crossword puzzle and tried to solve the Rubik's Cube. To summarize the Group Discussion/Interview, Mozart's music, at first, made them listen and relax, then, with continuous exposure, made them energized and inspired to do things, it also made reviewing/reading/studying enjoyable, it established a setting or scenario that learning is easy and delightful, it created an environment conducive to learning.
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: High Schools; Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A