NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing 1 to 15 of 28 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Coletta, Vincent P.; Bernardin, Josh; Pascoe, Daniel; Hoemke, Anatol – Physics Teacher, 2019
Physics instructors recognize the value of kinesthetic experience in learning fundamental physics concepts. We describe a kinesthetic experiment appropriate for both college and high school physics students. The experiment helps students achieve an intuitive understanding of Newton's second law in a way they find quite enjoyable. It was devised by…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Scientific Concepts, Teaching Methods
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Taniguchi, Darcy A. A.; Taniguchi, James; Ridgway, Sam; Schulz, Kathryn – Physics Teacher, 2019
The lesson presented here provides a multifaceted inquiry-based opportunity to develop a deep grasp of Archimedes' principle. It was originally developed for high school teachers as part of their training in the basic structure of the Next Generation Science Standards. There are numerous demonstrations illustrating Archimedes' principle, many of…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Inquiry, Scientific Principles, High Schools
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Briggs, Michael – Physics Teacher, 2019
The mystery tube is a fairly well known activity among science teachers for illustrating the nature of science. A variety of procedures have been presented for carrying out this activity, such as Scott Miller's method based on the BCSE 5E Instructional Model. Mystery tubes and other "black box" activities allow the students to engage in…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Scientific Principles, Teaching Methods
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Liang, Qingsheng; Wei, Yajun – Physics Teacher, 2018
"How does an aircraft fly?" is one of the most frequently asked science questions by young pupils. The lift on airplane wings also makes a great example of the application of the Bernoulli principle while teaching fluid mechanics in introductory physics and engineering courses. The topic is of great interest and is therefore covered in…
Descriptors: Physics, Visualization, Teaching Methods, Air Transportation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
McManus, Jeff – Physics Teacher, 2017
Many physics students have experienced the difficulty of internalizing concepts in electrostatics. After studying concrete, measurable details in mechanics, they are challenged by abstract ideas such as electric fields, flux, Gauss's law, and electric potential. There are a few well-known hands-on activities that help students get experience with…
Descriptors: Physics, Teaching Methods, Hands on Science, Scientific Concepts
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Lamore, Brian – Physics Teacher, 2016
For years the fan cart has provided physics students with an excellent resource for exploring fundamental mechanics concepts such as acceleration, Newton's laws, impulse, momentum, work-energy, and energy conversions. "The Physics Teacher" has even seen some excellent do-it-yourself (DIY) fan carts and activities. If you are interested…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Mechanics (Physics), Motion
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Papacosta, Pangratios; Linscheid, Nathan – Physics Teacher, 2016
Experiments that measure the speed of sound in air are common in high schools and colleges. In the Kundt's tube experiment, a horizontal air column is adjusted until a resonance mode is achieved for a specific frequency of sound. When this happens, the cork dust in the tube is disturbed at the displacement antinode regions. The location of the…
Descriptors: Motion, Measurement Equipment, Measurement Techniques, Acoustics
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
de Paiva, Eduardo – Physics Teacher, 2016
Every year millions of people contract cancer in the world, and according to prediction of the World Health Organization by the year 2030 there will be about 27 million new cases. Because of these figures and the resulting social and economic implications of this disease, radiotherapy, which is one form of treatment that uses ionizing radiation,…
Descriptors: High School Students, Physics, Radiology, Cancer
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
D'Anna, Michele; Corridoni, Tommaso – Physics Teacher, 2015
Thin film interference manifests itself in a wide range of visually pleasing situations in everyday life (in the colored effects caused by a drop of oil on water, in soap bubbles, etc.) and is also involved in important technical applications (semi-reflecting mirrors, anti-reflection lenses, etc.). Yet, despite its familiarity, high school…
Descriptors: Science Experiments, Science Activities, High School Students, Scientific Concepts
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane Bray – Physics Teacher, 2015
In this paper, a discrepant event is used to initiate a learning cycle lesson to help students develop an understanding of the concept and equation for buoyant force. The data are gathered using readily available equipment and then graphically analyzed using a four-step analysis consistent with the modeling instructional approach. This laboratory…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Physics, Scientific Principles, Scientific Concepts
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr. – Physics Teacher, 2014
Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Physics, High Schools, Secondary School Science
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian – Physics Teacher, 2014
Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the…
Descriptors: Handheld Devices, Technology Uses in Education, Recreational Activities, Parks
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Cross, Rod – Physics Teacher, 2013
A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical and…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Physics, Motion, Scientific Concepts
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hobson, Art – Physics Teacher, 2011
I'll outline suggestions for teaching elementary particle physics, often called "high energy physics," in high school or introductory college courses for non-scientists or scientists. Some presentations of this topic simply list the various particles along with their properties, with little overarching structure. Such a laundry list approach is a…
Descriptors: Introductory Courses, Physics, Science Instruction, Teaching Methods
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Denny, Mark – Physics Teacher, 2011
The internal ballistics of a firearm or artillery piece considers the pellet, bullet, or shell motion while it is still inside the barrel. In general, deriving the muzzle speed of a gunpowder firearm from first principles is difficult because powder combustion is fast and it very rapidly raises the temperature of gas (generated by gunpowder…
Descriptors: Weapons, Mechanics (Physics), Science Instruction, Scientific Principles
Previous Page | Next Page ยป
Pages: 1  |  2