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Showing 121 to 135 of 171 results Save | Export
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Vick, Matthew – Physics Teacher, 2010
From MP3 players to cell phones to computer games, we're surrounded by a constant stream of ones and zeros. Do we really need to know how this technology works? While nobody can understand everything, digital technology is increasingly making our lives a collection of "black boxes" that we can use but have no idea how they work. Pursuing…
Descriptors: High Schools, Music, Technology Integration, Optics
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Paredes, Jesus; del Barco, Enrique – Physics Teacher, 2010
High school physics students are often capable of, and commonly interested in, understanding natural phenomena beyond those described in their textbooks. In order to supplement the shortage of topics covered in their physics courses, many students turn to popular scientific books, journals, and other media. There, they discover a plethora of…
Descriptors: Web Sites, High Schools, Electronic Publishing, Textbooks
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Galeriu, Calin – Physics Teacher, 2010
Making a loudspeaker is a very rewarding hands-on activity that can be used to teach about electro-magnetism and sound waves. Several loudspeaker designs have been described in this magazine. The simplest loudspeaker has only a magnet, a coil, and three plastic cups. The simpler devices require a powerful amplified output, e.g., from a boom box.…
Descriptors: High School Students, Science Education, Science Instruction, Physics
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Angiolillo, Paul J.; Lynch, Jonathan – Physics Teacher, 2010
Ask any physicist what the preeminent journal in the field is, and I think the almost unanimous answer will be "Physical Review Letters" ("PRL"). This weekly journal of the American Physical Society publishes high-impact research from all the major subdisciplines of physics. This journal is not the one you would think is the first place a high…
Descriptors: High Schools, Student Projects, Physics, Science Experiments
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Goldader, Jeffrey D.; Choi, Seulah – Physics Teacher, 2010
Finding ways to demonstrate--in a high school classroom--that subatomic particles from space produce other particles capable of reaching the Earth's surface is not a trivial task. In this paper, we describe a Geiger-Muller tube-based cosmic ray coincidence detector we produced at a total cost of less than $200, using two tubes purchased used…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Physics, Secondary School Science, High Schools
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Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr. – Physics Teacher, 2010
Let us now praise famous physicists, and the apparatus named after them, with apologies to the writer of Ecclesiastes. I once compiled a list of about 300 pieces of apparatus known to us as X's Apparatus. Some of the values of X are familiar, like Wheatstone and Kelvin and Faraday, but have you heard of Pickering or Rhumkorff or Barlow? In an…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Laboratory Equipment, Science Experiments
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Oldaker, Bruce G.; Jacobs, Greg; Bibilashvili, Tengiz – Physics Teacher, 2010
We introduce the USAYPT--the United States Association for Young Physicists Tournaments, Inc. Our motto is "Better teaching and learning by doing research in your high school." We believe that all high school teachers can improve their knowledge of physics by forming small groups that perform non-trivial--but not cutting edge--research. In order…
Descriptors: High Schools, Physics, Experiential Learning, Secondary School Teachers
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Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J. – Physics Teacher, 2010
The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…
Descriptors: Undergraduate Students, High Schools, Motion, Scientific Concepts
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Faleski, Michael C. – Physics Teacher, 2010
The PhysicsBowl is a contest for high school students that was first introduced in 1985. In this article, we discuss both some of the history of the contest as well as the 25th contest occurring this year.
Descriptors: High School Students, Physics, Student Research, Organizations (Groups)
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Stinner, Arthur; Metz, Don – Physics Teacher, 2010
This article is intended to model the ascent of the space shuttle for high school teachers and students. It provides a background for a sufficiently comprehensive description of the physics (kinematics and dynamics) of the March 16, 2009, "Discovery" launch. Our data are based on a comprehensive spreadsheet kindly sent to us by Bill Harwood, the…
Descriptors: Secondary School Teachers, High School Students, Spreadsheets, Science Instruction
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Heck, Andre; Uylings, Peter – Physics Teacher, 2010
Casio Computer Co., Ltd., brought in 2008 high-speed video to the consumer level with the release of the EXILIM Pro EX-F1 and the EX-FH20 digital camera.[R] The EX-F1 point-and-shoot camera can shoot up to 60 six-megapixel photos per second and capture movies at up to 1200 frames per second. All this, for a price of about US $1000 at the time of…
Descriptors: Photography, High School Students, Physics, Science Instruction
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Laubach, Timothy A.; Elizondo, Lee A.; McCann, Patrick J.; Gilani, Shahryar – Physics Teacher, 2010
When illuminating four "mystery" vials of nanoparticle solution with a 405-nm light emitting diode (LED), four distinct colors related to the peak wavelength of fluorescent emission can be observed. This phenomenon perplexes high school physics students and leads to the subsequent exploratory question, "Why are the four vials emitting a different…
Descriptors: Inquiry, Science Instruction, Physics, Science Activities
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Sadler, Philip M.; Night, Christopher – Physics Teacher, 2010
What kinds of astronomical lab activities can high school and college astronomy students carry out easily in daytime? The most impressive is the determination of latitude and longitude from observations of the Sun. The "shooting of a noon sight" and its "reduction to a position" grew to become a daily practice at the start of the 19th century…
Descriptors: Marine Education, Astronomy, High School Students, College Students
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Davids, Mark; Forrest, Rick; Pata, Don – Physics Teacher, 2010
Wireless communications are ubiquitous. Students and teachers use iPhones[R], BlackBerrys[R], and other smart phones at home and at work. More than 275 million Americans had cell phones in June of 2009 and expanded access to broadband is predicted this year. Despite the plethora of users, most students and teachers do not understand "how they…
Descriptors: Constructivism (Learning), Information Theory, Pilot Projects, Physics
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McKagan, Sam – Physics Teacher, 2010
This article describes workshops for high school physics teachers in Uganda on inquiry-based teaching and PhET simulations. I hope it increases awareness of the conditions teachers face in developing countries and inspires others to give similar workshops. This work demonstrates what is possible with some concerted, but not extraordinary, effort.
Descriptors: High Schools, Physics, Workshops, Secondary School Science
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