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Williams, Ryan J.; Chergosky, Anthony J. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
This article describes various iterations of a Supreme Court simulation that we developed for undergraduate political science classes. We address when simulations should be used to introduce a topic to students, and when simulations should be used to develop students' understanding of a topic after introducing it. In the simulations, we played the…
Descriptors: Court Litigation, Simulation, Political Science, Teaching Methods
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Wunische, Adam – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Active learning techniques are being use with increasing frequency in the classroom and more time is being dedicated to designing and implementing them. However, the literature still suffers from a lack of rigorous empirical methods to test the effects of simulations. Most of the claimed benefits of utilizing simulations, and other active learning…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Active Learning, Lecture Method, Political Science
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Hunt, Kate – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
While the use of active learning exercises and the incorporation of popular culture in the classroom have increased in recent years, the study of potential gendered effects on learning and engagement when it comes to these practices has been limited. In this study, data are collected from international politics courses using a zombie outbreak as…
Descriptors: Undergraduate Students, Active Learning, Popular Culture, Political Science
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Deejay, Aleks; Rublee, Maria Rost; Zech, Steven T. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
This article details a role-playing "citizenship simulation" used in a large graduate seminar offered by the Masters of International Relations (IR) faculty at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. While recognizing the need for a more systematic analysis of the relationship between class size and active learning strategies, this…
Descriptors: Graduate Students, Role Playing, Citizenship Education, Large Group Instruction
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Audette, Andre P. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Duverger's Law--the principle that first-past-the-post systems tend to promote two major political parties while proportional representation systems tend to promote multipartism--is a commonly taught topic in introductory and some upper-level political science courses across subfields. However, it also contains concepts that are difficult for…
Descriptors: Political Science, Teaching Methods, Political Attitudes, Social Systems
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Berg, Lukas; Chambers, John – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Over the course of three semesters spanning the 2016 primary and general elections, we conducted a series of quasi-experiments to evaluate the effects of prediction markets on undergraduate interest in the political process. We gave several classes in our institution's core American politics course the opportunity to collectively invest in…
Descriptors: Voting, Political Science, Introductory Courses, Prediction
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Fielder, James D. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
This single lesson classroom game is designed to test student knowledge of Realist and Liberal concepts through an imbalanced resource bargaining mechanic. The game is designed for approximately 20 students divided into state teams of three to four students each and uses chocolate to represent the state teams' economic capacity, military…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Educational Games, Active Learning, International Relations
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Linantud, John; Kaftan, Joanna – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
This article uses a multimethod research design to compare Statecraft to non-Statecraft assignments and courses along three dimensions: student engagement, political attitudes, and academic honesty. The results indicate that Statecraft increased student engagement and academic honesty. In terms of political attitudes, students generally remained…
Descriptors: Political Science, Teaching Methods, Comparative Analysis, International Relations
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Blackstone, Bethany; Oldmixon, Elizabeth – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
This article explores the efficacy of specifications grading in undergraduate political science classes. Specifications grading organizes instruction around a set of learning objectives and evaluates student success based on the achievement of carefully articulated specifications for each assessment. Assessments are considered satisfactory or…
Descriptors: Grading, Undergraduate Students, Political Science, Best Practices
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Mitchell, Jocelyn Sage – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
The learning objectives of the introductory American Government course, one of the most common entry-level political science classes in American universities, span both content knowledge and civic education. Much research has shown the pedagogical value of integrated learning--taking part in active and authentic experiences with democracy at the…
Descriptors: Introductory Courses, United States Government (Course), Teaching Methods, Active Learning
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Mikell, Ray – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
From 2012 to 2016, American news headlines were dominated at various times by the killing of black men either stopped by police or presumed to be engaging in suspicious activity, and protests that spread through the Internet social media hashtag #blacklivesmatter. In this piece, the author revisits his time in teaching at an historically black…
Descriptors: Active Learning, Teaching Methods, Current Events, Emotional Response
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Phillips, John LaForest – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Political theory lags behind other subfields in political science in rigorously testing what helps foster critical thinking (CT). Yet some of the greatest temptations to engage in motivated reasoning can be found in normative political contexts. This study uses multiple regression analysis to explore nine semesters of data from an introductory…
Descriptors: Political Science, Critical Thinking, Teaching Methods, Introductory Courses
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Fischer, Beth A. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Stories can be employed in a variety of ways in college classrooms--such as in case studies, simulations, and problem-based learning (PBL) activities. Sometimes these stories are historically accurate, while in other instances they are fictional. What might be the benefits and challenges of using fictional narratives? This article draws upon data…
Descriptors: Active Learning, Teaching Methods, Problem Based Learning, College Students
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Chagas-Bastos, Fabrício H.; Burges, Sean W. – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
When new graduates begin employment in industries such as government, consultancies, or the nongovernmental sector they are expected to have the skills needed to write politically-informed reports accurately. Teaching how to write briefing notes provides students with an important skill, but also provides an effective instrument for examining…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Political Science, International Relations, Skill Development
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Pinar Alakoc, Burcu – Journal of Political Science Education, 2019
Despite its popularity among students, terrorism is a sensitive and emotive topic that is difficult to learn, and challenging to teach. Given the lack of a simple definition, terrorism is hard to explain objectively and comprehensively. Perceptually value-laden and provocative, it can reinforce stereotypes and prejudices against a group of people…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Terrorism, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Stereotypes