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ERIC Number: EJ1116432
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: 12
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1940-5847
Supporting and Developing Self-Regulatory Behaviours in Early Childhood in Young Children with High Levels of Impulsive Behaviour
Dan, Aviva
Contemporary Issues in Education Research, v9 n4 p189-200 2016
Deficits in self-regulatory skills underlie or contribute to a range of adverse developmental problems and disorders, including ADHD (Barkley, 1997), eating disorders (Attie & Brooks-Gunn, 1995) and risk -taking behaviour (Cantor & Sanderson 1998; Eisenberg et al., 2005). Self-regulation has been recognised as an important factor in aiding academic achievements of school-age children. There is less knowledge of the subject in early childhood, yet the development of self-regulatory has been described as an important milestone in early childhood development (Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000). This research describes the implementation of an intervention programme in kindergartens that aimed to help young children with highly impulsive behaviour, develop self-regulatory behaviors. The children were identified by the Achenbach Child behaviour check list (1.5-5) and by the kindergarten teachers. This Research was based on mixed methods. The quantitave data reveled a number of children with highly impulsive behaviour and difficulties in self-regulation. The qualitative data gave a deeper interpretation to these children's behaviour and the difficulties involved. After the implementation of the program, the kindergarten teachers reported on an increase in the children's self-regulatory skills. By understanding and supporting the processes involved in the development of self-regulation skills, it might be possible for significant adults in young children's lives to have a substantial effect in aiding young children, who are highly impulsive. This was the rationale for the present research.
Clute Institute. 6901 South Pierce Street Suite 239, Littleton, CO 80128. Tel: 303-904-4750; Fax: 303-978-0413; e-mail: Staff@CluteInstitute.com; Web site: http://www.cluteinstitute.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Early Childhood Education; Kindergarten; Primary Education; Preschool Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Israel
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Child Behavior Checklist