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Sperry, Douglas E.; Sperry, Linda L.; Miller, Peggy J. – Child Development, 2019
In response to Golinkoff, Hoff, Rowe, Tamis-LeMonda, and Hirsh-Pasek's (2018) commentary, we clarify our goals, outline points of agreement and disagreement between our respective positions, and address the inadvertently harmful consequences of the word gap claim. We maintain that our study constitutes a serious empirical challenge to the word…
Descriptors: Vocabulary Development, Language Acquisition, Child Development, Definitions
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Grimes, David Robert; Bishop, Dorothy V. M. – Child Development, 2018
Exposure to nonionizing radiation used in wireless communication remains a contentious topic in the public mind--while the overwhelming scientific evidence to date suggests that microwave and radio frequencies used in modern communications are safe, public apprehension remains considerable. A recent article in "Child Development" has…
Descriptors: Guidelines, Child Development, Radiation, Telecommunications
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Hardell, Lennart – Child Development, 2018
The use of digital technology has grown rapidly during the last couple of decades. During use, mobile phones and cordless phones emit radiofrequency (RF) radiation. No previous generation has been exposed during childhood and adolescence to this kind of radiation. The brain is the main target organ for RF emissions from the handheld wireless…
Descriptors: Handheld Devices, Telecommunications, Children, Adolescents
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Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Tiokhin, Leonid – Child Development, 2018
Bjorklund synthesizes promising research directions in developmental psychology using an evolutionary framework. In general terms, we agree with Bjorklund: Evolutionary theory has the potential to serve as a metatheory for developmental psychology. However, as currently used in psychology, evolutionary theory is far from reaching this potential.…
Descriptors: Biology, Developmental Psychology, Evolution, Models
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Bjorklund, David F. – Child Development, 2018
In 1997, I argued that with the loss of Piaget's theory as an overarching guide, cognitive development had become disjointed and a new metatheory was needed to unify the field. I suggested developmental biology, particularly evolutionary theory, as a candidate. Here, I examine the increasing emphasis of biology in cognitive development research…
Descriptors: Child Development, Developmental Psychology, Piagetian Theory, Developmental Stages
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Keating, Daniel P. – Child Development, 2016
Lester, Conradt, and Marsit (2016) have assembled a set of articles that bring to readers of "Child Development" the scope and impact of the exponentially growing research on epigenetics and child development. This commentary aims to place this work in a broader context of theory and research by (a) providing a conceptual framework for…
Descriptors: Child Development, Genetics, Research
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Dunn, Judy – Child Development, 2010
J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov's article (this issue) about domains of parenting and their links with different aspects of childhood outcome raises both interesting questions and challenges. Four of these concerns are discussed in relation to early childhood. First is the issue of bidirectionality. Recent studies highlight the contribution of…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Individual Differences, Children, Parent Child Relationship
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Turiel, Elliot – Child Development, 2010
J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) have taken good steps in formulating a domain-specific view of parent-child interactions. This commentary supports the introduction of domain specificity to analyses of parenting. Their formulation is an advance over formulations that characterized parental practices globally. This commentary calls for…
Descriptors: Parent Child Relationship, Interpersonal Relationship, Child Development, Classification
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Gelman, Susan A. – Child Development, 2010
The domain-specific approach to socialization processes presented by J. E. Grusec and M. Davidov (this issue) provides a compelling framework for integrating and interpreting a large and disparate body of research findings, and it generates a wealth of testable new hypotheses. At the same time, it introduces core theoretical questions regarding…
Descriptors: Socialization, Learning Theories, Cognitive Development, Guidelines
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Quinn, Paul C. – Child Development, 2008
J. Kagan (2008) urges contemporary developmentalists to (a) be cautious when attributing conceptual knowledge to infants based on looking-time performance, (b) constrain their interpretation of infant performance with multiple methodologies, and (c) reconsider the possibility that qualitative development may be the path by which perceptual infants…
Descriptors: Infants, Child Development, Infant Behavior, Concept Formation
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Muller, Ulrich; Giesbrecht, Gerald – Child Development, 2008
This commentary on J. Kagan (2008) addresses 2 issues. The first concerns the importance of studying developmental sequences and processes of change. The second concerns epistemological differences between contemporary neonativist approaches and classical theories of development. The commentary argues that classical theories of infant cognition…
Descriptors: Infants, Epistemology, Cognitive Development, Child Development
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Campos, Joseph J.; Witherington, David; Anderson, David I.; Frankel, Carl I.; Uchiyama, Ichiro; Barbu-Roth, Marianne – Child Development, 2008
This commentary endorses J. Kagan's (2008) conclusion that many of the most dramatic findings on early perceptual, cognitive, and social competencies are ambiguous. It supports his call for converging research operations to disambiguate findings from single paradigms and single response indices. The commentary also argues that early competencies…
Descriptors: Infants, Skill Development, Child Development, Perceptual Development
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Gomez, Juan-Carlos – Child Development, 2007
This article presents a tentatively "balanced" view (i.e., midway between lean and rich interpretations) of pointing behavior in infants and apes, based upon the notion of intentional reading of behavior without simultaneous attribution of unobservable mental states. This can account for the complexity of infant pointing without attributing…
Descriptors: Infants, Cognitive Development, Primatology, Nonverbal Communication
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Southgate, Victoria; van Maanen, Catharine; Csibra, Gergely – Child Development, 2007
Tomasello, Carpenter, and Liszkowski (2007) present compelling data to support the view that infant pointing, from the outset, is communicative and deployed in many of the same situations in which adults would ordinarily point for one another, either to share their interest in something, or to informatively help the other person. This commentary…
Descriptors: Infants, Nonverbal Communication, Learning, Motivation
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D'Entremont, Barbara; Seamans, Elizabeth – Child Development, 2007
Tomasello, Carpenter, and Liszkowski (2007) present a comprehensive review of the infant pointing literature. They conclude that infant pointing demonstrates communicative intent from its onset, at about 1 year of age. In this commentary, it is noted that for infants to understand communicative intent, they must have a concept of self and others…
Descriptors: Infants, Social Cognition, Nonverbal Communication, Child Development
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