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Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A.; Lu, Ting – Child Development, 2016
This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Mothers, Parent Child Relationship, Security (Psychology)
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Shneidman, Laura; Gweon, Hyowon; Schulz, Laura E.; Woodward, Amanda L. – Child Development, 2016
How does early social experience affect children's inferences and exploration? Following prior work on children's reasoning in pedagogical contexts, this study examined U.S. children with less experience in formal schooling and Yucatec Mayan children whose early social input is predominantly observational. In Experiment 1, U.S. 2-year-olds…
Descriptors: Social Experience, Inferences, Social Development, Cross Cultural Studies
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Salomo, Dorothe; Liszkowski, Ulf – Child Development, 2013
Daily activities of forty-eight 8- to 15-month-olds and their interlocutors were observed to test for the presence and frequency of triadic joint actions and deictic gestures across three different cultures: Yucatec-Mayans (Mexico), Dutch (Netherlands), and Shanghai-Chinese (China). The amount of joint action and deictic gestures to which infants…
Descriptors: Sociocultural Patterns, Nonverbal Communication, Infants, Cultural Differences
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Silva, Katie G.; Correa-Chavez, Maricela; Rogoff, Barbara – Child Development, 2010
The study builds on ethnographic research noting an emphasis in many Indigenous communities of the Americas on learning through keen observation of and participation in ongoing community activities. Forty-four U.S. Mexican-heritage 5- to 11-year-old children whose families likely have experience with Indigenous ways more frequently attended to and…
Descriptors: Indigenous Populations, Ethnography, Foreign Countries, Genealogy
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Mejia-Arauz, Rebeca; Rogoff, Barbara; Dexter, Amy; Najafi, Behnosh – Child Development, 2007
This article examines how 31 triads of 6- to 10-year-old children from 3 cultural backgrounds organized their interactions while folding Origami figures. Triads of children whose families had immigrated to the United States from indigenous heritage regions of Mexico (and whose mothers averaged only 7 grades of schooling) coordinated more often as…
Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Children, Immigrants, Group Activities
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Maynard, Ashley E. – Child Development, 2002
Examined the development of teaching skills in older siblings responsible for teaching their younger siblings to become competent members of their culture among children from a Zinacantec Maya village in Chiapas, Mexico. Found that by age 4, children took responsibility for initiating teaching situations with their younger siblings, and by 8,…
Descriptors: Children, Cognitive Development, Cognitive Structures, Foreign Countries
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Miller, Kenneth E. – Child Development, 1996
Examined the mental health and psychosocial development of 58 Guatemalan Mayan children living in 2 refugee camps in the Mexican state of Chiapas. Found only minimal evidence of psychological trauma among the children and a positive relationship between children's mental health and the health status (physical and mental) of their mothers. (MDM)
Descriptors: Adolescents, Children, Depression (Psychology), Emotional Development
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Wagner, Daniel A. – Child Development, 1974
Subjects from urban and rural Yucatan were tested on a short-term and incidental memory task. Urban subjects were in school, whereas most rural subjects were not. Results indicated that formal schooling is an important factor in the development of mnemonic skills in short-term memory. (ST)
Descriptors: Adolescents, Adults, Age Differences, Attention