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ERIC Number: EJ994031
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Nov
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 82
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-0663
Changes in Help Seeking from Peers during Early Adolescence: Associations with Changes in Achievement and Perceptions of Teachers
Ryan, Allison M.; Shim, Sungok Serena
Journal of Educational Psychology, v104 n4 p1122-1134 Nov 2012
Students' academic help seeking from peers was examined at 6-month intervals for 3 time points spanning the transition from elementary school to middle school (N = 655; 53.6% girls, 46.4% boys; 53.9% African American, 46.1% European American). Adaptive help seeking from peers declined over time, whereas expedient help seeking from peers increased. Increases in expedient help seeking were associated with declines in achievement; changes in adaptive help seeking were unrelated to achievement. Developmental trajectories of help seeking were related to changes in student perceptions of their teachers. Increases in student perceptions of an emphasis on mastery goals and teacher support were associated with increases in adaptive help seeking from peers. Increases in student perceptions of performance goals, and declines in teacher support, were associated with increases in expedient help seeking from peers. Thus, the nature of help seeking from peers develops in early adolescence, has implications for achievement, and is sensitive to changes in the perceived characteristics of teachers across the transition to middle school. (Contains 4 tables and 1 footnote.)
American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org/publications
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Education; Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A