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ERIC Number: EJ957815
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2004-May
Pages: 27
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 42
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0090-4392
Civic Responsibility among Australian Adolescents: Testing Two Competing Models
da Silva, Lisa; Sanson, Ann; Smart, Diana; Toumbourou, John
Journal of Community Psychology, v32 n3 p229-255 May 2004
The development of civic responsibility is considered to be an important component of healthy adolescent development. However, the study of its development has been relatively neglected and few studies have attempted to ground understanding of its development in a theoretical framework. The present study operationalized civic responsibility as attitudes and behaviors relating to political and community issues that are beneficial to society and compared two theoretical causal models, the social development model (SDM) and a coping-competency model for their predictive value. Gender differences were also assessed. A total of 500 subjects, drawn from a longitudinal study (the Australian Temperament Project), participated in the study, using questionnaire and interview data. Approximately 1 in 5 adolescents actively engaged in behaviors reflecting community civic responsibility and less than 1 in 10 actively participated in the political arena. However, positive levels of social awareness were evident. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that the SDM had the most predictive value for political and community civic responsibility. Peer encouragement and peer participation were the most significant predictors. Variables from the coping-competency model played some role in the prediction of community, but not political, civic responsibility. Gender differences in community civic responsibility, but not political civic responsibility, were found. One in two adolescents indicated that they would participate in volunteer work or political activities if more opportunities existed. This suggests the need for greater availability of appropriate community-oriented activities for adolescents. (Contains 9 tables.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Australia