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ERIC Number: EJ950867
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Nov
Pages: 6
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 20
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1042-9670
Acculturative Stressors and Acculturative Strategies as Predictors of Negative Affect among Chinese International Students in Australia and Hong Kong: A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study
Pan, Jia-Yan; Wong, Daniel Fu Keung
Academic Psychiatry, v35 n6 p376-381 Nov 2011
Objective: There are few studies comparing cross-cultural adaptation of migrant groups in two different cultural settings. This study compares the level of negative affect and acculturative stressors between Chinese international students in Australia and Mainland Chinese students in Hong Kong. The predictive effects of acculturative stressors and acculturative strategies on negative affect were also compared between the two groups. Method: A total of 606 graduate students were recruited for a cross-sectional survey in Melbourne, and Hong Kong, China. The measurement included the Acculturative Hassles Scale for Chinese Students, Acculturative Strategy Scale, and Chinese Affect Scale. Independent t-tests and hierarchical regression analysis were conducted for data analysis. Results: Chinese international students in Australia were found to encounter more acculturative stressors and experience a higher level of negative affect than their counterparts in Hong Kong. The acculturative stressor of academic work and a marginalization strategy significantly predicted negative affect in both groups. The acculturative stressor of cultural difference predicted negative affect in the Hong Kong sample, and assimilation strategy predicted negative affect in the Australian sample only. Conclusion: It is more difficult for Chinese international students to adapt to a host society with greater cultural distance. Cross-cultural comparative study helps to find out culture-general and culture-specific predictors of acculturation and helps design tailor-made intervention programs for international students across cultures. (Contains 2 tables.)
American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc. 1000 Wilson Boulevard Suite 1825, Arlington, VA 22209-3901. Tel: 800-368-5777; Tel: 703-907-7856; Fax: 703-907-1092; e-mail: appi@psych.org; Web site: http://ap.psychiatryonline.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Australia; China; Hong Kong