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ERIC Number: EJ944136
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Nov
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 33
ISSN: ISSN-0039-3746
The Concept of Profound Boredom: Learning from Moments of Vision
Gibbs, Paul
Studies in Philosophy and Education, v30 n6 p601-613 Nov 2011
This paper recognizes that we become bored in our post-modern, consumerist Western world and that boredom is related to this existence and hidden within it. Through Heidegger, it seeks to provide a way to structure our understanding of boredom and suggest ways of acknowledging its cause, and then to allow it to liberate our authentic appreciation of the world of our workplace and what can be learnt through it. Using the approach of focusing on being in a societal workplace environment, and the link to Heidegger's notion of mood, revealed in "Being and Time," boredom's fundamental role is shown as a complex temporal manifold. Our superficial attempts to deal with things in datable time means that we miss the essential importance of the temporal manifold through which our being is revealed and where the Augenblick, (moment of vision) is the authentic present and temporalises itself of the authentic future (Heidegger in "Being and time" (trans: J. Macquarrie and E. Robinson). Blackwell, Oxford, 1962, p. 338). For Heidegger this is to be understood as ecstasis (ibid, p. 338) when the resolute Dasein "is carried away to whatever possibilities and circumstances are encountered" (ibid, p. 338). Such resoluteness enables the private capabilities to arise in public practice, not, however, in the conformity of what "one does" (Das Man) but as an authentically choosing being. The challenge of an ontological pedagogy, regardless of its place of revelation that this prescribes a possibly be edifying mission for Dasein. Instead of chasing away boredom through busyness, a moment of vision could produce creative and authentic ways of being.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A