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ERIC Number: EJ942383
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 59
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-2984
A Matter of Diversity, Equity, and Necessity: The Tension between Maryland's Higher Education System and Its Historically Black Colleges and Universities over the Office of Civil Rights Agreement
Palmer, Robert T.; Davis, Ryan J.; Gasman, Marybeth
Journal of Negro Education, v80 n2 p121-133 Spr 2011
Eighteen years after the Supreme Court rendered its decision in Fordice, many states have complied somewhat or not at all to its mandates. This has been particularly evident in Maryland, where the presidents of historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are pressuring the state to fulfill its commitment with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR), stemming from Fordice, to make HBCUs comparable to their White peers. While Maryland has declared that it has complied with its OCR agreement by preventing unnecessary program duplication between HBCUs and White institutions, investing more money into HBCUs, and increasing racial diversity on all of its public campuses, leaders of the State's HBCUs charge Maryland with not fully honoring its commitment. In this article, the authors will discuss Maryland's collegiate desegregation plan, stemming from the Supreme Court's decision--"U. S. v. Kirk Fordice", and explain the tension resulting from the HBCUs leaders' accusations of Maryland's lack of commitment to this agreement.
Howard University School of Education. 2900 Van Ness Street NW, Washington, DC 20008. Tel: 202-806-8120; Fax: 202-806-8434; e-mail: journalnegroed@gmail.com; Web site: http://www.journalnegroed.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education; Two Year Colleges
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Maryland
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: United States v Fordice