NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ940963
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Oct
Pages: 13
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0016-9013
Stayers, Leavers, and Switchers among Certified Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Investigation of Turnover Intent, Staff Retention, and Turnover
Rosen, Jules; Stiehl, Emily M.; Mittal, Vikas; Leana, Carrie R.
Gerontologist, v51 n5 p597-609 Oct 2011
Purpose: Studies of certified nursing assistant (CNA) turnover in nursing homes are typically cross-sectional and include full-time and part-time workers. We conducted a longitudinal study to evaluate the job factors and work attitudes associated with just full-time staying or leaving. For those who did not stay, we assessed reasons for leaving and satisfaction following job transition. Design and Methods: A random sample of CNAs identified through the Pennsylvania Department of Health's CNA registry, working greater than or equal to 30 hr weekly in a nursing facility was surveyed by telephone at baseline and 1 year later. Results: Of the 620 responding to both surveys, 532 (85.8%) remained (stayers), 52 (8.4%) switched to another facility (switchers), and 36 (5.8%) left the industry (leavers). At baseline, switchers reported higher turnover intentions and fewer benefits compared with stayers and left for new opportunities. Leavers had lower job satisfaction and emotional well-being and left for health reasons. Turnover intentions were predicted by low job satisfaction and low emotional well-being. Actual turnover was predicted only by turnover intentions and by the absence of health insurance. Pay was not a predictor of turnover intent or turnover. Implications: There are two distinct groups of CNAs contributing to turnover. Attitudinal factors, such as job satisfaction and emotional well-being, are mediated via turnover intentions to effect actual turnover. Even accounting for methodological differences, this turnover rate is lower than previous studies, which use alternative methods and include part-time workers. This study should help nursing home administrators better understand the work-related factors associated with staff turnover.
Oxford University Press. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP, UK. Tel: +44-1865-353907; Fax: +44-1865-353485; e-mail: jnls.cust.serv@oxfordjournals.org; Web site: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Pennsylvania