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ERIC Number: EJ939489
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Oct
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0361-476X
Face-to-Face versus Computer-Mediated Discussion of Teaching Cases: Impacts on Preservice Teachers' Engagement, Critical Analyses, and Self-Efficacy
PytlikZillig, Lisa M.; Horn, Christy A.; Bruning, Roger; Bell, Stephanie; Liu, Xiongyi; Siwatu, Kamau O.; Bodvarsson, Mary C.; Kim, Doyoung; Carlson, Deborah
Contemporary Educational Psychology, v36 n4 p302-312 Oct 2011
Two frequently-used discussion protocols were investigated as part of a program to implement teaching cases in undergraduate educational psychology classes designed for preservice teachers. One protocol involved synchronous face-to-face (FTF) discussion of teaching cases, which occurred in class after students had individually completed written case analyses as homework outside of class. The other was asynchronous computer-mediated (CM) discussion taking place outside of class, simultaneous to students' completion of their written case analyses. Six class offerings of an undergraduate child development course taught by two instructors (three classes by each instructor) were randomly assigned within instructor in a quasi-experimental design to one of the three discussion conditions: FTF, CM, or no discussion of the cases across the semester. Findings indicated that both CM and FTF discussion conditions were associated with positive outcomes relative to the control condition. Both CM and FTF discussion related to higher cognitive-affective engagement with the cases than the control condition; and the CM discussion condition was associated with higher cognitive-affective engagement than FTF discussion. In contrast, FTF discussion, but not CM discussion, was associated with higher-than-control-condition case analysis ability at the end of the semester. Potential explanations for these findings and directions for future research are discussed. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A