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ERIC Number: EJ935688
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Sep
Pages: 12
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 45
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1050-8392
Interactions between MAOA Genotype and Receipt of Public Assistance: Predicting Change in Depressive Symptoms and Body Mass Index
Marmorstein, Naomi R.; Hart, Daniel
Journal of Research on Adolescence, v21 n3 p619-630 Sep 2011
Response to stress is determined in part by genetically influenced regulation of the monoamine system (MAOA). We examined the interaction of a stressor (receipt of public assistance) and a gene regulating MAOA in the prediction of change in adolescent depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI). Participants were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health (Add Health) genetically informative subsample. We focused on males due to the fact that males only have one MAOA allele. Growth curve analyses were conducted to assess the associations between public assistance, MAOA allele, and their interaction and the intercept and slope of depressive symptoms and BMI. The results indicated that among males, MAOA allele type interacted with receipt of public assistance in the prediction of rate of change in both depressive symptoms and BMI from early adolescence through early adulthood. Males with the short MAOA allele whose families received public assistance tended to experience increased growth in depressive symptoms and BMI. Implications of the findings for understanding the relations among stress, physiology, and development are discussed.
Wiley-Blackwell. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8598; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com; Web site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health