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ERIC Number: EJ933158
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0028-3932
Behavioural and Event-Related Potentials Evidence for Pitch Discrimination Deficits in Dyslexic Children: Improvement after Intensive Phonic Intervention
Santos, Andreia; Joly-Pottuz, Barbara; Moreno, Sylvain; Habib, Michel; Besson, Mireille
Neuropsychologia, v45 n5 p1080-1090 2007
Although it is commonly accepted that dyslexic children have auditory phonological deficits, the precise nature of these deficits remains unclear. This study examines potential pitch processing deficit in dyslexic children, and recovery after specific training, by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and behavioural responses to pitch manipulations within natural speech. In two experimental sessions, separated by 6 weeks of training, 10 dyslexic children, aged 9-12, were compared to reading age-matched controls, using sentences from children's books. The pitch of the sentence's final words was parametrically manipulated (either congruous, weakly or strongly incongruous). While dyslexics followed a training focused on phonological awareness and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, controls followed a non-auditory training. Before training, controls outperformed dyslexic children in the detection of the strong pitch incongruity. Moreover, while strong pitch incongruities were associated with increased late positivity (P300 component) in controls, no such pattern was found in dyslexics. Most importantly, pitch discrimination performance was significantly improved, and the amplitude of the late positivity to the strong pitch incongruity enhanced, for dyslexics after a relatively brief period of training, so that their pattern of response more closely resemble those of controls. (Contains 4 tables and 5 figures.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A