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ERIC Number: EJ932069
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Feb
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0748-478X
Stepping Up
Scully, Maura King
CURRENTS, v37 n2 p16-21 Feb 2011
"Vice president for advancement becomes college president." Once headline-grabbing news, the so-called "advancement presidency" is not as rare as it was 25 years ago. Still, it is by no means commonplace. Beyond established relationships with the board of trustees, chief advancement officers--by personality and training--bring valuable skills to the top job. Advancement professionals also know how to tell an institution's story. Advancement professionals by and large like people. That's a great personal characteristic to bring to the presidency. And given the nature of a presidency, it's essential. But beyond just high tolerance for interaction, advancement professionals know how to build and maintain productive relationships and appreciate what they mean to an institution. No matter how many wonderful qualities they possess, advancement professionals-turned-presidents have a key audience to win over once they arrive on campus: faculty. Naturally, one of the benefits of an advancement president is a willingness to engage in the fundraising part of the job. But with that willingness to engage major donors comes a deep understanding about the entire advancement operation. However, that understanding can sometimes come with unrealistic expectations on the part of the advancement office, whether spoken or unspoken. For those currently in advancement and thinking about a future move to the presidency, prospects ahead look good. Demography is on the side of the "outsider." This article includes some tips from those who have been there.
Council for Advancement and Support of Education. 1307 New York Avenue NW Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-328-2273; e-mail: memberservicecenter@case.org; Web site: http://www.case.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: Administrators
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A