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ERIC Number: EJ930638
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 18
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0017-8055
Responding to Claims of Misrepresentation
Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark
Harvard Educational Review, v80 n3 p413-417 Fall 2010
In their paper "Unfair Treatment? The Case of Freedle, the SAT, and the Standardization Approach to Differential Item Functioning" (Santelices & Wilson, 2010), the authors studied claims of differential effects of the SAT on Latinos and African Americans through the methodology of differential item functioning (DIF). Previous research (Freedle, 2003) identified a systematic relationship between item difficulty and DIF results in the SAT: harder items tended to systematically benefit minority students while easier items benefited white students. The systematic phenomenon was explained by a cultural and linguistic hypothesis. The authors' article investigated the relationship between item difficulty and DIF by replicating and expanding on this highly controversial previous research. Their analysis addressed criticisms (Dorans, 2004; Dorans & Zeller, 2004) against Freedle's 2003 article by analyzing data from more recent test forms, considering the effect of no responses in the DIF methodology, and considering the possibility of guessing in the scoring used. This was done using the standardization approach to DIF. The results confirmed the relationship in the Verbal test for the White/African American comparison. There is no evidence in the study, however, that this phenomenon occurred in Math test items, nor was it observed in the White/Latino comparison. This article presents the authors' rejoinder to the Dorans and Freedle responses.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: SAT (College Admission Test)