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ERIC Number: EJ926242
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-May
Pages: 20
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 40
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0010-0994
Remembering Sappho: New Perspectives on Teaching (and Writing) Women's Rhetorical History
Enoch, Jessica; Jack, Jordynn
College English, v73 n5 p518-537 May 2011
Remembering Sappho, from a pedagogical perspective, usually means that teachers bring recovered women's rhetorics into the classroom, prompting students to come to know women as rhetorical agents by analyzing the rhetorical strategies they used to make their voices heard. Teaching women's rhetorics in this way works toward the ultimate goal of introducing students to a revised and expanded rhetorical tradition--one that not only includes women rhetors but also embraces rhetorical practices alternative to the competitive, public, agonistic, and linear tactics so highly valued for over two thousand years. In this essay, the authors imagine a different way to remember rhetorical women like Sappho, and a different way to teach women's rhetorical history. The pedagogies they forward explore the rhetorical practice of remembering women. The authors discuss courses in which they examined with students female rhetors' historical presence in the public imagination, investigating how rhetorical work has inscribed these women into public memory and erased them from it. This essay reflects on the authors' individual pedagogical projects that explore the part women's pasts play in the public imagination, focusing particularly on the work they do with students to analyze and produce public memories about rhetorical women. As they engage in this conversation, they join with scholars such as Joy Ritchie and Kate Ronald, who continually experiment with innovative ways to teach women's rhetorics. The authors' ultimate goal is to forward a new pedagogical option for teachers of women's rhetorics--one that draws students' attention outside the classroom to consider the public and rhetorically powerful project of women's memorialization. (Contains 3 notes.)
National Council of Teachers of English. 1111 West Kenyon Road, Urbana, IL 61801-1096. Tel: 877-369-6283; Tel: 217-328-3870; Web site: http://www.ncte.org/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A