NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: EJ925465
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Apr
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0748-478X
Talking about Transparency
Goldsmith, Rae
CURRENTS, v35 n4 p22-26 Apr 2009
In his inaugural address, U.S. President Barack Obama linked the need to demonstrate accountability and transparency to the earning of trust. His connection of these dots is not surprising, since taxpayers often expect accountability and transparency from their governments, just as governments, donors, alumni, and students expect accountability and transparency from the educational institutions they support. But there's a major difference. Governments that lose the trust of their citizens still collect taxes. When educational institutions lose the trust of their constituents, they may also lose funding, enrollment, volunteers, and advocates--the concrete support of committed stakeholders. Campus communicators at public as well as private institutions understand their role in earning the trust of their constituents and know that to earn trust, they must demonstrate institutional accountability. But that isn't to say it is always easy. In fact, communicators have been grappling with this issue for a number of years. But many communicators find it challenging to demonstrate accountability and transparency because of increasing pressures by the number and varied interests of campus constituents. This article discusses how campus communicators can play a critical role in helping their institutions demonstrate accountability by staying attuned to the external environment, identifying issues, defining strategies, developing and delivering messages, and engaging constituents in the discussion.
Council for Advancement and Support of Education. 1307 New York Avenue NW Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 202-328-2273; e-mail: memberservicecenter@case.org; Web site: http://www.case.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States