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ERIC Number: EJ924528
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Jul
Pages: 16
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 37
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1570-2081
Risk, Error and Accountability: Improving the Practice of School Leaders
Perry, Lee-Anne
Educational Research for Policy and Practice, v5 n2 p149-164 Jul 2006
This paper seeks to explore the notion of risk as an organisational logic within schools, the impact of contemporary accountability regimes on managing risk and then, in turn, to posit a systems-based process of risk management underpinned by a positive logic of risk. It moves through a number of steps beginning with the development of an understanding of risk, the risk society and the logic of risk derived from the seminal work of Douglas (1992, "Risk and blame: essays in cultural theory," London: Sage), Beck (1992, "Risk society: towards a new modernity." London: Sage) and Giddens (1990, "The consequences of modernity." Cambridge: Polity Press). Second, the paper juxtaposes this understanding of risk with the rise of accountability imperatives and an "audit culture" [Strathern (1997) "European Review, 5(3)," 305-321] in public institutions, including schools. It then moves to consider how a systems-based approach to risk management, drawing on Reason's (1990, "Human Error." New York: Cambridge University Press) model of human error minimisation, could be usefully developed for schools. Such an approach would be built on a positive risk logic which maintains the flexibility, innovativeness and adaptability so necessary in education and avoids the more deleterious effects of many current forms of accountability and risk management which reflect avoidance, conformity and rigidity.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A