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ERIC Number: EJ918777
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Apr
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0016-9013
Does Fall History Influence Residential Adjustments?
Leland, Natalie; Porell, Frank; Murphy, Susan L.
Gerontologist, v51 n2 p190-200 Apr 2011
Purpose of the study: To determine whether reported falls at baseline are associated with an older adult's decision to make a residential adjustment (RA) and the type of adjustment made in the subsequent 2 years. Design and Methods: Observations (n = 25,036) were from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative sample of community-living older adults, 65 years of age and older. At baseline, fall history (no fall, 1 fall no injury, 2 or more falls no injury, or 1 or more falls with an injury) and factors potentially associated with RA were used to predict the initiation of an RA (i.e., moving, home modifications, increased use of adaptive equipment, family support, or personal care assistance) during the subsequent 2 years. Results: Compared with those with no history of falls, individuals with a history of falls had higher odds of making any RA. Among those making an RA, individuals with an injurious fall were more likely than those with no history of a fall to start using adaptive equipment or increase their use of personal care assistance. Implications: The higher initiation of RAs among fallers may indicate proactive steps to prevent future falls and may be influenced by interactions with the health care system. To optimize fall prevention efforts, older adults would benefit from education and interventions addressing optimal use of RAs before falls occur.
Oxford University Press. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP, UK. Tel: +44-1865-353907; Fax: +44-1865-353485; e-mail: jnls.cust.serv@oxfordjournals.org; Web site: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Adult Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A