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ERIC Number: EJ907172
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Nov
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 27
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0744-8481
Characteristics Associated with Genital Herpes Testing among Young Adults: Assessing Factors from Two National Data Sets
Gilbert, Lisa K.; Levandowski, Brooke A.; Roberts, Craig M.
Journal of American College Health, v59 n3 p143-150 Nov 2010
Objectives and Participants: In the United States, genital herpes (GH) prevalence is 10.6% among 20- to 29-year-olds and about 90% of seropositive persons do not know their status. This study investigated individual characteristics associated with GH screening and diagnosis in sexually active young adults aged 18 to 24. Methods: Two data sets were analyzed: the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) Wave III from 2001 to 2002 (n = 11,570) and the American College Health Association's (ACHA's) national survey of college students from 2000 to 2006 (n = 222,470). Results: In Add Health, 18.4% of females and 7.1% of males self-reported GH testing in the previous 12 months, compared to 0.7% for self-reported GH diagnosis in ACHA. GH testing and diagnosis was strongly positively associated with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the previous 12 months for both sexes. Conclusions: Integrating herpes screening and testing into HIV and standard STI screening would identify more infections. (Contains 2 tables and 2 figures.)
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health