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ERIC Number: EJ901575
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 5
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0892-4562
How Active Are Your Students? Increasing Physical Activity in Schools
Avery, Marybell; Brandt, Janet
Strategies: A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators, v24 n1 p34-35 Sep-Oct 2010
The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that youth engage in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day, most of which should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. Half of this amount (30 minutes) should be achieved during the school day. NASPE provides guidance in the form of a comprehensive school physical activity program that includes these components: (1) quality physical education; (2) before-school and after-school strategies; (3) during-school strategies (outside of physical education); (4) school employee wellness programs; and (5) family and community involvement. Of all these components of a comprehensive school physical activity program, physical education teachers have the most control over the first--quality physical education. By employing appropriate instructional practices as described by NASPE, teachers can increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of their physical education students. One such practice is to employ "instant activity" to begin each class. Instant activity includes physical activities that require few instructions, have been previously taught, allow students to start on their own, and can be done independently or with a partner. For example, upon entering the gym, students travel around the perimeter using various locomotor movements, such as skip, gallop, and slide. This activity can serve two purposes: (1) to provide MVPA; and (2) to allow the teacher to assess locomotor skills. Physical educators can begin their efforts to increase physical activity in schools by ensuring the delivery of quality physical education. Once this priority has been addressed, they can lead the way to the establishment of a comprehensive school physical activity program.
American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191. Tel: 800-213-7193; Fax: 703-476-9527; e-mail: info@aahperd.org; Web site: http://www.aahperd.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A