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ERIC Number: EJ897981
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Oct
Pages: 25
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1366-7289
Transfer Effects in the Interpretation of Definite Articles by Spanish Heritage Speakers
Montrul, Silvina; Ionin, Tania
Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, v13 n4 p449-473 Oct 2010
This study investigates the role of transfer from the stronger language by focusing on the interpretation of definite articles in Spanish and English by Spanish heritage speakers (i.e., minority language-speaking bilinguals) residing in the U.S., where English is the majority language. Spanish plural NPs with definite articles can express generic reference ("Los elefantes tienen colmillos de marfil"), or specific reference ("Los elefantes de este zoologico son marrones"). English plurals with definite articles can only have specific reference ("The elephants in this zoo are brown"), while generic reference is expressed with bare plural NPs ("Elephants have ivory tusks"). Furthermore, the Spanish definite article is preferred in inalienable possession constructions ("Pedro levanto la mano" "Peter raised the hand"), whereas in English the use of a definite article typically means that the body part belongs to somebody else (alienable possession). Twenty-three adult Spanish heritage speakers completed three tasks in Spanish (acceptability judgment, truth-value judgment, and picture-sentence matching tasks) and the same three tasks in English. Results show that the Spanish heritage speakers exhibited transfer from English into Spanish with the interpretation of definite articles in generic but not in inalienable possession contexts. Implications of this finding for the field of heritage language research and for theories of article semantics are discussed.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A