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ERIC Number: EJ894026
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008
Pages: 7
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 24
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0155-2147
Transformative Dialogue
Maney, Beverley
English in Australia, v43 n2 p67-73 2008
In my years as a student and as a teacher, I have come to understand that what matters most in schools are teachers. This is not a new phenomenon, nor is it a view I alone hold. It has become a mantra among academics, the media and politicians. All too frequently we are held accountable for all that is wrong with schools. Yet as teachers we believe things to be different. Behind those closed doors away from the scrutiny of the media and politicians, we are making a difference to the lives of our students. This article draws on a research project titled "Teachers Investigate Unequal Literacy Outcomes: Cross-generational Perspectives", in which I was among 25 teacher-researchers across Victoria and South Australia who researched our practices in order to improve student achievement. Much has already been written about the success of this project (e.g. Boyer et al. 2004, Comber & Kamler 2004, Kamler & Comber 2008) therefore I will re-visit one of its key initiatives: cross-generational mentoring. It was this initiative that was the catalyst for my works as an early career teacher to develop my competencies and confidence in improving the literacy outcomes of students "at-risk". I begin with a brief overview of the project aims, more specifically cross-generational mentoring. Extracts from previous research titled "The effects of cross-generational mentoring on an early career teacher's professional identity and practice" will be drawn on to illustrate the kind of work undertaken between an early and late-career teacher and reflect on its impact in transforming our pedagogical practices.
Australian Association for the Teaching of English. English House, 416 Magill Road, Kensington Gardens, SA 5068 Australia. Tel: +61-8-8332-2845; Fax: +61-8-8333-0394; e-mail: aate@aate.org.au; Web site: http://www.aate.org.au
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Australia