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ERIC Number: EJ892070
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Aug
Pages: 10
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 39
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-006X
Impact of Race on Early Treatment Termination and Outcomes in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Treatment
Lester, Kristin; Artz, Caroline; Resick, Patricia A.; Young-Xu, Yinong
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, v78 n4 p480-489 Aug 2010
Objective: The present study investigated the influence of race on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment among 94 African American and 214 Caucasian female victims of interpersonal violence participating in 2 studies of cognitive-behavioral treatment for PTSD that were conducted sequentially and continuously. Method: In each study, participants were randomized into 1 of 3 conditions. The first study compared cognitive processing therapy with prolonged exposure and a delayed treatment condition. In the second study, cognitive processing therapy was compared with its constituent components: cognitive therapy only and written accounts. Participants were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, as well as through self-report measures of PTSD. Results: Analyses revealed that African Americans were significantly less likely to complete treatment compared with Caucasians (45% vs. 73%, respectively, p less than 0.001) and that the differences held even after controlling for education and income. Despite racial differences in treatment completion status, analyses with the intent-to-treat sample indicated no racial differences in outcomes on PTSD measures. Conclusions: The lack of difference in treatment outcomes despite racial differences in dropout may be explained by greater symptom improvement of African Americans who dropped out compared with Caucasians who dropped out. Implications of these findings and practical approaches to addressing sociocultural barriers to care are explored. (Contains 6 tables.)
American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org/publications
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A