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ERIC Number: EJ889130
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Jul
Pages: 23
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 45
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0042-0859
Does the Race of Neighborhood Role Models Matter? Collective Socialization Effects on Educational Achievement
Ainsworth, James W.
Urban Education, v45 n4 p401-423 Jul 2010
This study examines whether neighborhood level collective socialization processes are racialized. It addresses whether Black and White students are affected differentially by their general neighborhood characteristics; whether the racial composition of positive and negative role models in a neighborhood shape student performance differently; and whether Black and White students receive differential benefit from the presence of same-race role models. Using the National Educational Longitudinal Study (NELS) of 1988 linked to 1990 Census information at the neighborhood level, the current study finds that race generally does not critically influence neighborhood effects on educational achievement. Theoretical implications of these results are discussed, and I recommend that the when considering who can act as a role model for ethnic minority youth, policy makers should consider a broader range of individuals than just same-race individuals. This research suggests that White adults may also be able to positively affect change for students "at risk" for underachievement. Finally, another take-away message of this research is that the talents and abilities of all neighborhood adults need to be fully tapped to address the problem of educational underachievement. (Contains 2 tables and 4 notes.)
SAGE Publications. 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320. Tel: 800-818-7243; Tel: 805-499-9774; Fax: 800-583-2665; e-mail: journals@sagepub.com; Web site: http://sagepub.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A