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ERIC Number: EJ885884
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Dec
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0342-5282
Intensified Voice Therapy: A New Model for the Rehabilitation of Patients Suffering from Functional Dysphonias
Fischer, Michael J.; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Ptok, Martin
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, v32 n4 p348-355 Dec 2009
The objective of this study was to evaluate a new intervention for chronic dysphonias, consisting of a 2-week outpatient treatment period using intensified voice therapy combined with elements of physical medicine, including physiotherapy (orthotherapy, detonisation and training of the trunk muscles, respiratory therapy and others), manual therapy (mobilization of the cervical spine), inhalations, vibration massages, thermotherapy, classical massages and active relaxation (e.g. autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation). In addition, the autonomous regulation was influenced by hydrotherapy according to Kneipp. A handicap questionnaire was given to 37 patients with diverse aetiologies of dysphonia before and after intervention. The change score was compared between baseline handicap levels (none, mild, moderate, severe), and between patients with organic and functional dysphonias. The questionnaire was also given to 40 healthy volunteers for comparison with patients' baseline values. Overall handicap was significantly reduced in patients with moderate baseline handicap values, whereas no significant changes could be detected in patients with severe handicap; patients with mild handicap values did receive some benefit. A significant difference in the intervention outcome was found between patients with organic and functional dysphonias. In conclusion, the results suggest that ambulatory rehabilitative measures are most effective in patients with moderate functional dysphonias, and that severe dysphonias with organic backgrounds may require longer rehabilitation phases.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A