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ERIC Number: EJ882280
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1499-4046
Food Consumption Patterns of Nigerian Adolescents and Effect on Body Weight
Olumakaiye, M. F.; Atinmo, Tola; Olubayo-Fatiregun, M. A.
Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, v42 n3 p144-151 May-Jun 2010
Objective: Association between nutritional status of adolescents and food consumption pattern. Design: Data on number of meals and snacks consumed daily were collected using structured questionnaires. Nutritional status was assessed as weight-for-age body mass index score less than fifth percentile of the National Center for Health Statistics/World Health Organization International Growth Reference. Setting: Cross-sectional studies of adolescents using multistage random sampling procedure. Participants: 401 adolescents from 32 secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. Analysis: Frequency counts, percentages, and cross-tabulation analysis were used to analyze data, analysis of variance was used to test the differences, as well as chi-square analysis. Level of significance was taken at 0.05 and 0.01 levels. Results: 66.1% of adolescents ate 3 meals daily; this percentage was higher among rural (75.4%) than urban (61.4%) children (P less than 0.001). About 33.0% consumed snacks daily but to a varying degree, which was higher among urban than rural adolescents (P = 0.002). Prevalence of underweight was 20.1%, more common in rural (22.1%) than urban adolescents (18.7%). Underweight prevalence was highest among those who ate 3 meals and no snacks daily (28.6%) and least among those who ate 3 meals and snacks twice daily (15.9%). Conclusion: Snacks are important in food consumption among adolescents; when snacks are consumed in addition to 3 meals, they will improve the nutritional status of adolescents. (Contains 6 tables and 1 figure.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Nigeria