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ERIC Number: EJ878572
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010
Pages: 10
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1750-9467
Autistic Traits in the General Population: What Mediates the Link with Depressive and Anxious Symptomatology?
Rosbrook, Ainslie; Whittingham, Koa
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, v4 n3 p415-424 Jul-Sep 2010
The high prevalence of anxiety disorders and depression within the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population is widely recognised. This study examined the role of three potential mediating variables in the relationship between autistic traits and depressive/anxious symptomatology in the general population. Participants included 231 university students (114 males, 117 females) ranging in age from 17 to 35 (M=18.9, SD=2.77). Participants completed five standardised questionnaires which measured: autistic traits, depressive/anxious symptomatology, social competence, social problem-solving ability, and teasing history. Two multiple mediation analyses were conducted using the bootstrapping method. Results revealed that social problem-solving ability and past teasing experiences were significant partial mediators in the relationship between autistic traits and depressive symptoms. However, contrary to expectations, social competence was not a significant mediator in the relationship between autistic traits and depressive symptoms. In addition, social problem-solving ability and past teasing experiences were significant partial mediators in the relationship between autistic traits and anxiety symptoms. This suggests that interventions to reduce anxious and depressive symptomatology in the ASD population should focus upon improving social problem-solving ability and reducing bullying experiences at school. These initial findings should be confirmed in the ASD population in future research. (Contains 5 tables and 2 figures.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A