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ERIC Number: EJ874709
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Jan
Pages: 3
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1541-6224
Learning by Editing a Scholarly Journal
Hamrick, Florence A.
Journal of Women in Educational Leadership, v4 n1 p61-63 Jan 2006
After serving two three-year terms as a member of the Editorial Board of the "Journal of College Student Development," the author was nominated by a colleague for the position of editor. In this article, the author shares a set of significant learning experiences that have taught her a great deal about journal editing, about leadership and professionalism, and about herself and regards this essay as a progress report on learning. One principal thing she has learned is that editing a journal involves taking all available opportunities (and creating additional opportunities) to bring the journal to the attention of people who may be interested in its contents and may be interested in contributing their own manuscripts for consideration. The most important thing she has learned--or more precisely--has had reinforced, is something that educators already know full well: people are most central to the success of just about any endeavor. The individuals with whom she has been able to form partnerships are critical to the continued success of the journal. She has also learned that being a journal editor is a role, like any other, that one grows into and helps to define along the way. She has thus had the opportunity to learn more about herself in these processes involving role "fit." Educators know that learning is a process, and that they as educators as well as learners make continual adjustments based in part on what they learn about a number of things, in any number of ways. They engage in continual processes of doing, thinking, evaluating, reflecting, feeling, and coming to working conclusions and understandings that guide them to learn still more and re-evaluate what they think they know or have gained. Most discrete learning experiences eventually come to an end.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A