NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ872917
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Jan
Pages: 7
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1096-7516
MBTI Personality Type and Other Factors that Relate to Preference for Online versus Face-to-Face Instruction
Harrington, Rick; Loffredo, Donald A.
Internet and Higher Education, v13 n1-2 p89-95 Jan 2010
Online college classes are being offered at a rate that far exceeds the growth of overall higher education classes. However, much can still be learned about how to create a better online classroom environment by determining why a large percentage of students continue to prefer face-to-face classes. One factor among many that may have an influence on preference is personality since it relates to learning style and comfort level. A poor fit in learning style or a low comfort level can lead to student dissatisfaction and attrition. The current study gave 166 mostly female college students, two-thirds of whom were taking or had taken four or more online classes, the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and a Likert-type questionnaire asking why they preferred one teaching modality delivery over the other. Results revealed that a statistically significant majority of Introverts preferred online classes and Extraverts face-to-face classes. A trend with a small effect size toward Perceiving types preferring face-to-face classes was also found. Overall, students who preferred online classes indicated their rank ordered preference was because of convenience, the enjoyment of computer technology, and a desire for innovation whereas those who preferred face-to-face classes reported they were influenced by the class structure appealing to their need to learn through listening and by their desire to better gauge the emotional reactions of others in the class. Implications for design of online classes to appeal to students who prefer face-to-face learning environments and for academic counseling and advising are discussed. (Contains 3 tables.)
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Myers Briggs Type Indicator