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ERIC Number: EJ871771
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Jan
Pages: 8
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0145-2134
Persistent Socioeconomic and Political Dilemmas to the Implementation of the 1989 United Nations' Convention on the Rights of the Child in Sub-Saharan Africa
Mulinge, Munyae M.
Child Abuse & Neglect: The International Journal, v34 n1 p10-17 Jan 2010
Objective: The aim of this article is to revisit the subject of the implementation of the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in Africa. Specifically, the article is an update to a previous article titled "Implementing the 1989 United Nations' Convention on the Rights of the Child in sub-Saharan Africa: The Overlooked Socioeconomic and Political Dilemmas", which was published in the Journal of Child Neglect and Abuse Volume 26 2002. It assesses the extent to which the conditions identified in 2002 as militating against the protection of children's rights have been overcome since then. Method: The paper is a review essay and utilizes existing literature from varied sources to advance its main arguments. It draws from such documents to assess the extent to which socioeconomic and political barriers to the protection of children's rights in Africa have been overcome since 2002. Results: The ratification of the United Nation's 1989 Convention, the adoption of supportive continental and regional protocols and the passing of supportive legislation and policies by governments have not resulted in major improvements in the wellbeing of children. The socioeconomic and political conditions that were identified in 2002 still persist in many countries and continue to impede the protection of children's rights across most of the Africa. In particular, poverty, and rampant corruption, HIV/AIDS, armed conflicts and wars, and failure to enforce existing legislations continue to stand in the way of the realization of children's rights. Conclusion: The effective implementation of the 1989 UN Convention by African governments requires more than the ratification of the Convention and its supporting international and continental conventions, the adoption of regional protocols, and the passing of country specific legislations and policies. The continent in general and governments in particular must isolate and mainstream into their efforts the persistent diverse and unique socio-economic and political conditions that undermine the protection of the rights of the child. Existing legislations should be enforced, poverty eradicated, corruption minimized, HIV/AIDS controlled, armed conflicts and wars minimized, and the public must be educated about children's rights, including existing protective legislations and policies. (Contains 1 table.)
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Africa