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ERIC Number: EJ870837
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 16
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 15
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0013-1946
Education for Toleration in an Era of Zero Tolerance School Policies: A Deweyan Analysis
Rice, Suzanne
Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association, v45 n6 p556-571 2009
Americans in U.S. Society find themselves at a historical juncture where schools are implementing zero tolerance policies and--at the same time--also trying to promote tolerance, typically across differences such as race, class, culture, ability, and religion. Both these efforts respond to deeply held and serious concerns. But depending on the particulars of the schools and policies involved, these efforts are often in tension, if not conflict. This article seeks to join and further the conversation about tolerance in this age of zero tolerance policies by drawing on the thoughts of John Dewey. First and most generally, Dewey provides a way to rethink the apparent contradiction between "zero tolerance" and "tolerance" policies and practices. Second, Dewey's conception of habit provides insight into how an attribute such as tolerance might be nurtured in schools and other contexts, and how doing so addresses the need for more harmonious relations between students. The first section of this article provides a discussion about the concept of zero tolerance, its evolution over time, and how this concept has been incorporated in school policy. In the second section, the idea of tolerance itself is taken up. The third section begins with an overview of Dewey's conception of habit and then provides an analysis of tolerance as a kind of habit; the conditions necessary for cultivating the habit of tolerance are discussed here, as well. The concluding section examines the extent to which, conceptually and practically, zero tolerance policies are compatible with efforts to promote tolerance among children and youth in schools. (Contains 1 note.)
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 325 Chestnut Street Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Fax: 215-625-2940; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A