NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ869989
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Feb
Pages: 9
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0016-9013
Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes
Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl
Gerontologist, v50 n1 p112-120 Feb 2010
Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care, and interaction are associated with such agreement. Design and Methods: This cross-sectional study examined agreement in 336 family-staff pairs of postdeath telephone interviews conducted as part of the Collaborative Studies of Long-Term Care. Eligible deaths occurred in or within 3 days of leaving one of a stratified random sample of 113 long-term care facilities in four states and after the resident had lived in the facility 15 days of the last month of life. McNemar p values and kappas were determined for each concordance variable, and mixed logistic models were run. Results: Chance-adjusted family-staff agreement was poor for expectation of death within weeks (66.9% agreement, [kappa] = 0.33), course of illness (62.9%, 0.18), symptom burden (59.6%, 0.18), and familiarity with resident's physician (59.2%, 0.05). Staff were more likely than family to expect death (70.2% vs 51.5%, p less than 0.001) and less likely to report low symptom burden (39.6% vs 46.6%, p = 0.07). Staff involvement in care related to concordance and perspectives of adult children were more similar to those of staff than were other types of family members. Implications: Family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences may differ substantially; efforts can be made to improve family-staff communication and interaction for joint decision making.
Oxford University Press. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, OX2 6DP, UK. Tel: +44-1865-353907; Fax: +44-1865-353485; e-mail: jnls.cust.serv@oxfordjournals.org; Web site: http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A