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ERIC Number: EJ869024
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 8
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 8
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1094-9046
Web 2.0 and You
Baumbach, Donna J.
Knowledge Quest, v37 n4 p12-19 Mar-Apr 2009
The World Wide Web has come a long way in a very short time. A little more than a decade ago, with the invention of Mosaic, the first browser to display images inline with text instead of displaying images in a separate window, and Netscape, the first graphical user interface (browser), people began to experience a rapid expansion of information. Within the last three to four years, AJAX and other technologies have made it possible for software developers to create Web applications that communicate with the server, allowing elements on a webpage to change within the static page. These applications, collectively called Web 2.0 tools, enable interactivity and easily created content by contributors with no knowledge of programming. Using such tools, anyone can read "and" write on the Web, consuming "and" producing information. In this article, the author investigates these tools through a survey with school library media specialists to establish some baseline data about knowledge of Web 2.0 tools, to discover innovative uses of these tools in school library media programs, and to identify opportunities for professional development. Four major barriers to the use of Web 2.0 tools in school library media centers were identified in the survey: (1) tools inaccessible at school; (2) erosion of informal professional development time; (3) lack of relevant training opportunities; and (4) lack of knowledge. When asked what kinds of Web 2.0 tools library media specialists would like to learn more about, most reported they wanted to learn more about all of them and, more specifically, about how they are being used in schools and school library media programs. The author provides reasons why library media specialists should learn and use Web 2.0 tools. (Contains 6 figures.)
American Association of School Librarians. Available from: American Library Association. 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611. Tel: 1-800-545-2433; Web site: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/aasl/aaslpubsandjournals/knowledgequest/knowledgequest.cfm
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Adult Education; Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: Media Staff
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A