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ERIC Number: EJ868326
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0009-1383
Artes Illiberales? The Four Myths of Liberal Education
O'Sullivan, Maurice
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, v41 n5 p22-27 Sep-Oct 2009
The phrase "liberal education" has begun obliterating more precise and meaningful terms. At first the author assumed that in using it, those public intellectuals who regularly gather to redefine higher education or set benchmarks for it had merely found an abbreviated way of describing a liberal-arts education. After Jeffrey Nesteruk took the argument a step further the following year by calling for a blending of "business and liberal education" in the online report from the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College (Volume 5.8 [August 2005]), the author finally understood that these higher ed prophets were not only employing a new phrase but introducing a new concept. What they appear to be envisioning is an educational philosophy without hierarchies or distinctions--one that focuses on process rather than content, rewards adaptation rather than depth, and celebrates change rather than continuity. And that vision has quickly become higher education's orthodoxy. Spearheading the liberal-education movement has become a primary mission of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), the nation's largest organization devoted to undergraduate education. The more the author has listened to those proclaiming their faith in this brave new world of lib ed, the more he has realized that much of their case teeters dangerously atop four myths. In this article, the author examines the four myths of liberal education.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A