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ERIC Number: EJ865370
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 21
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-8958
Running the Race to Improve Self-Efficacy
Putman, Michael
Kappa Delta Pi Record, v45 n2 p53-57 Win 2009
The idea of believing in oneself is a construct that goes by several names: (1) self-efficacy; (2) self-concept; and (3) self-esteem. How well a person thinks he or she will do in the completion of a task plays a significant role in how well that person will actually do. Positive self-beliefs have been linked to many benefits, including increased levels of persistence and motivation, willingness to try difficult tasks, higher achievement, and greater strategy use. On the other hand, negative ability-related beliefs can incur adverse consequences. Students who doubt their abilities show lower levels of intrinsic motivation and commitment, give minimal effort, and believe that poor performance is related to the lack of ability. Individuals who question their ability also are more likely to be influenced by some form of extrinsic motivator, such as a reward or grades. This phenomenon appears to be especially descriptive of middle school students who have been shown to focus on performance goals and to read for grades--outcomes that become synonymous with ability. When these readers are successful, they tend to attribute their success to the influence of the reward as opposed to their effort or ability. This view is especially troubling when examined in conjunction with the notable decreases in motivation that already occur as children progress through elementary and middle school. This article presents five ideas that will help create readers who believe in themselves.
Kappa Delta Pi. 3707 Woodview Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46268-1158. Tel: 800-284-3167; Tel: 317-871-4900; Fax: 317-704-2323; e-mail: pubs@kdp.org; Web site: http://www.kdp.org/publications/kdprecord/index.php
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Opinion Papers
Education Level: Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A