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ERIC Number: EJ861807
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 3
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0190-2946
Keeping Senior Women at Your College
Hurtado, Sylvia; DeAngelo, Linda
Academe, v95 n5 p18-20 Sep-Oct 2009
While women have made progress in many areas of higher education, institutions still need to focus attention on the advancement and retention of women at the highest academic ranks. According to data from the U.S. Department of Education's 2005 Fall Staff Survey, women represent only 40.6 percent of full-time faculty and 25.1 percent of full professors. It is important to understand faculty satisfaction and factors that may lead faculty to consider leaving for other institutions. Specific budgetary decisions may affect resources that are important for faculty satisfaction, especially in the area of teaching, and may affect women differently from men. How these decisions are implemented may, in turn, affect an institution's retention of women faculty. A new report, "The American College Teacher," released in 2009 by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), provides insights into areas of faculty work and satisfaction for men and women. Data for this report were collected during 2007 and 2008 by the Cooperative Institutional Research Program at the University of California, Los Angeles, which administers a triennial survey of faculty. These data include responses from 22,562 fulltime faculty members at 372 four-year colleges and universities nationwide; the responses are weighted to provide a normative profile of the American faculty population for the report. In this article, the authors delve further into the data to understand the relationship between women's satisfaction with their work and their consideration of leaving their institutions, focusing on the findings for senior women. The nationwide study points to the role of the dean and department chair in supporting women at the higher ranks of higher education.
American Association of University Professors. 1012 Fourteenth Street NW Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005. Tel: 800-424-2973; Tel: 202-737-5900; Fax: 202-737-5526; e-mail: academe@aaup.org; Web site: http://www.aaup.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States