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ERIC Number: EJ860284
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Oct
Pages: 5
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 5
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0031-921X
Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students
Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.
Physics Teacher, v46 n7 p423-427 Oct 2008
The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high school and college. Since most female physicists report that they became attracted to physics and decided to study it further while in high school, according to the International Study of Women in Physics, it is problematic that high school is also the stage at which females begin to opt out at much higher rates than males. Although half of the students taking one year of physics in high school are female, females are less likely than males to take a second or Advanced Placement (AP) physics course. In addition, the percentage of females taking the first physics course in college usually falls between 30% and 40%. In other words, although you may see gender parity in a first high school physics course, this parity does not usually persist to the next level of physics course. In addition, even if there is parity in a high school physics course, it does not mean that males and females experience the course in the same way. It is this difference in experience that may help to explain the drop in persistence of females.
American Association of Physics Teachers. One Physics Ellipse, College Park, MD 20740. Tel: 301-209-3300; Fax: 301-209-0845; e-mail: pubs@aapt.org; Web site: http://scitation.aip.org/tpt
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: High Schools; Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A