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ERIC Number: EJ859144
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 28
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1522-7227
The Effect of Task and Maternal Verbosity on Compliance in Toddlers
Hakman, Melissa; Sullivan, Maureen
Infant and Child Development, v18 n2 p195-205 Mar-Apr 2009
The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between compliance in toddlers and maternal verbosity as well as the type of task. Mothers and their toddlers completed a warm-up task, a proactive toy clean-up task, and a prohibitive forbidden objects task. Mothers were assigned to one of two verbosity conditions (high versus low) and to one of two nurturance conditions (high versus low) where the rates of verbosity and nurturance were experimentally manipulated. It was hypothesized that toddlers would demonstrate higher noncompliance when given high levels of verbosity than toddlers given low levels of verbosity. It was expected that toddlers would demonstrate higher noncompliance when given low levels of nurturance than toddlers given high levels of nurturance. It was also expected that toddlers would demonstrate more noncompliance in the prohibitive task than they would in the proactive task. Results indicated that the rates of child compliance were related to the level of maternal verbosity with greater noncompliance being exhibited by children who received high levels of verbosity than those who received low levels of verbosity. Child compliance rates were also related to the type of task, with greater noncompliance exhibited in the proactive task versus the prohibitive task. Excessive detail about what children should or should not do appears to be related to child behavior and supports Patterson's premise of "nattering." Child behavior also was related to the type of task in which the child was engaged. These findings have direct implications for individuals working with or raising very young children. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A