NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
ERIC Number: EJ857134
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 9
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0009-1383
Whither the Global Talent Pool?
Douglass, John Aubrey; Edelstein, Richard
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, v41 n4 p36-44 Jul-Aug 2009
In the long term, there is little doubt that US higher education will remain extremely attractive to foreign talent, due to the academic quality of a large number of its research universities; the legacy of a relatively open society for immigrants; and America's still strong, if slightly tarnished, reputation as a land of opportunity. However, a closer look at shifting higher education markets, and at the possible impact upon those markets from the evolving global recession, provides a more nuanced perspective for policymakers. In sum, there are already signs that the world market for student talent is shifting to the benefit of the US's competitors, and in bad economic times people may find that shift accelerating. Currently the US remains a good performer in attracting the world's growing cadre of international students to its graduate and professional schools, although it could do much better and its once dominant position is eroding. But it is an underperformer at the first-degree level when compared to its competitors. And perhaps most importantly, the U.S. lacks a strategic approach to capitalizing on the global pool of mobile students. So what has changed? Two macro-trends help explain the shift: growing demand and increased competition. Attracting and enrolling international students at the first-degree and graduate levels will require federal, state, and institutional partnerships. The authors suggest that the federal government develop national strategic goals for international student enrollments at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and link them to broader policy objectives in areas such as foreign relations, national economic development, and educational attainment. (Contains 5 figures.)
Heldref Publications. 1319 Eighteenth Street NW, Washington, DC 20036-1802. Tel: 800-365-9753; Tel: 202-296-6267; Fax: 202-293-6130; e-mail: subscribe@heldref.org; Web site: http://www.heldref.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Opinion Papers
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States