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ERIC Number: EJ856156
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Sep
Pages: 17
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 14
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0098-6291
(Re)Envisioning the Divide: The Impact of College Courses on High School Students
Taczak, Kara; Thelin, William H.
Teaching English in the Two-Year College, v37 n1 p7-23 Sep 2009
High school students taking college courses that simultaneously fulfill high school requirements and give general education credit toward a bachelor's degree have become more of a presence on college campuses across the nation. The purpose behind these programs appears to be the belief that dual enrollment (also known as "concurrent enrollment") provides students with momentum toward degree completion. According to Clifford Adelman, students who earn fewer than 20 credits by the end of the first calendar year of college enrollment tend to experience a "serious drag" on their attempts at completion, so a "transition process" is necessary at the high school level. Furthermore, the National High School Center finds that the programs also reduce the amount of remediation at the college level, help gain access to education formerly reserved for top-performing students only, and offset some of the high tuition costs of university education. This essay examines the effects of a dual enrollment program on teaching and learning in one particular section of English composition taught by an instructor the authors will call Professor Foley. Using data generated from qualitative research, the authors suggest that the cognitive capabilities of some dual enrollment students have not developed enough to handle effectively the challenges of the contemporary conception of composition. The authors believe that this furthers a regressive view of composition in the eye of the public, a view that does not take into consideration the research in the field and that focuses on current-traditional precepts to guide its perceptions. (Contains 4 notes.)
National Council of Teachers of English. 1111 West Kenyon Road, Urbana, IL 61801-1096. Tel: 877-369-6283; Tel: 217-328-3870; Web site: http://www.ncte.org/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: High Schools; Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A