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ERIC Number: EJ845983
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2006-Jan
Pages: 5
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1553-7544
Mobile Rah!
Villano, Matt
Campus Technology, v19 n5 p29, 32-33, 36, 38 Jan 2006
This article reports that at many institutions, fight songs are now playing all over campus: on the quad, on the bus, in the cafeteria, and sometimes (though not the ideal situation) even in class. Just about any place one would find a cellular phone, one can hear a school's fight song in all of its rah-rah glory. Thanks to a new and lucrative form of content delivery, the songs actually come from the phones themselves, as special polyphonic ring tones that students can purchase, program to replace the phone's traditional ring, and play every time they receive a call. Students buy the ditties for anywhere from $2 to $3 apiece, and download them from a variety of Internet sites. But that's only part of the transaction. Because the fight songs are licensed, colleges and universities receive a percentage of every sale. Taken individually, these fees don't amount to more than 10 or 15 percent of the total price. As thousands and thousands of students sign up, however, colleges can see tidy new revenue streams. Though the mobile content business for higher education is still in its infancy, opportunities surrounding mobile content delivery could be veritable goldmines for colleges and universities. Those schools that have been licensing content for some time have earned tens of thousands of dollars in a matter of months since the industry took off in the summer of 2005. Other schools can't sign up for the services quickly enough; across the country, campus VPs and marketing officials have been scrambling to get mobile content delivery programs up and running before the fall football season ends and the big-money winter basketball season begins. Most of these deals are built around ring tones, still images (such as graphical-logo wallpaper for cell phone screens), and video clips; the basic trio of mobile content in higher education today. In some cases, however, trailblazing schools are also inking mammoth licensing agreements for anything and everything: sports scores via text-messaging, breaking news updates, sales on merchandise, and more.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A