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ERIC Number: EJ836109
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Apr
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1553-7544
Wikis, Blogs, & More, Oh My!
Villano, Matt
Campus Technology, v21 n8 p42-44, 46, 48, 50 Apr 2008
Everyone seems to have a different definition for "Web 2.0," but most people agree the phrase describes a second generation of web-based communities and hosted services that aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing between users. Technically speaking, these new technologies include blogs, wikis, folksonomies (collaborative or social tagging), and social bookmarking sites such as Del.icio.us. In the business world, these technologies enable colleagues in different offices to work together on projects, and thus move those efforts ahead quickly and more easily than traveling to an in-person meeting or even teleconferencing. In higher education, however, achieving measurable results with these tools is a bit more challenging. Maybe that's because--for the academic community, at least--questions continue to swirl around the use of these technologies. Questions such as: What do these tools bring to the table? How can educators be certain students will use them? How does restructuring a curriculum around Web 2.0 actually make a difference in how students learn? Across the country, as more and more colleges and universities consider embracing Web 2.0, the educators and technologists involved feel a certain amount of trepidation, and even ponder the future of the movement. Yet, a handful of schools are starting to figure things out. For instance, at Boston College (Massachusetts), the State University of New York-Delhi, Lake Superior College (Minnesota), Grand Rapids Community College (Michigan), and Bentley College (Massachusetts), technologists recently have adopted Web 2.0 tools in an effort to improve collaboration. What works at these schools? In this article, the author provides examples of Web 2.0 components and tools--and the techniques being employed to foster their successful use--that one should consider before moving forward with one's own campus initiative.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Massachusetts; Michigan; Minnesota