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ERIC Number: EJ834274
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2007-Nov
Pages: 12
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1443-1475
Your Place or Mine? Evaluating the Perspectives of the Practical Legal Training Work Experience Placement through the Eyes of the Supervisors and the Students
Spencer, Rachel
International Education Journal, v8 n2 p365-376 Nov 2007
In order to qualify as a lawyer in Australia, each law graduate must complete a recognised practical qualification. In 2002, the Australasian Professional Legal Education Council (APLEC) published a recommended set of competency standards which all entry level lawyers should meet in order to be eligible to be admitted as a legal practitioner. Upon completion of a recognised and accredited course of Practical Legal Training (PLT), potential lawyers must apply to the Supreme Court of the state in which they wish to practise for admission as a legal practitioner. The admission application process is rigorous. Not only does an applicant have to demonstrate completion of all of the academic and practical requirements, but an applicant must also certify to being a "fit and proper person" to be admitted as a legal practitioner. At Flinders University, the PLT course includes 225 hours of work experience in a legal office. The Placement requirement raises issues of equity at various levels. Many students, especially those with children or other dependents, face several challenges in working full time (unpaid) for six weeks. Other students who are already working part-time or full-time in law firms resent having to spend class time in preparation for a placement. Many students are obliged for financial reasons to work full time at their placement and then work at night time to earn an income. Equally important is the question of the level and quality of supervision provided by workplace supervisors. Both employers and students are increasingly viewing the Placement as a recruitment opportunity rather than one of teaching and learning. This article explores these issues from the perspective of the supervising lawyers, the students and the pedagogical motivation of the placement.
Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society. ANZCIES Secretariat, Curtin University, Box U1987, Perth, WA Australia. Tel: +61-8-9266-7106; Fax: +61-8-9266-3222; e-mail: editor@iejcomparative.org; Web site: http://www.iejcomparative.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Australia