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ERIC Number: EJ833663
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009
Pages: 11
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 6
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0271-0579
Effectively Involving Faculty in the Assessment of Student Engagement
Nelson Laird, Thomas F.; Smallwood, Robert; Niskode-Dossett, Amanda Suniti; Garver, Amy K.
New Directions for Institutional Research, n141 p71-81 Spr 2009
The formal assessment of student engagement, as it has developed in recent years, is not necessarily a faculty-driven activity. Most faculty members who teach undergraduates are involved in the informal assessment of student engagement by taking attendance, observing student behaviors or expressions in class, providing feedback on assignments, and many other faculty activities involving assessing and making judgments about whether and how students are engaged in their academic work. Furthermore, as advisors, mentors, and concerned community members, faculty also often informally assess students' engagement with the cocurriculum. Yet the formal assessment of student engagement is generally handled by offices of institutional research or assessment offices or is controlled by a department or committee on campus that has assessment of students or student learning as part of its responsibilities. On many campuses, institutionalizing the assessment of student engagement runs into several forms of faculty "game playing." For example, through overcriticism of an assessment process or instrument, faculty members frequently stall or shut down discussion about what can be learned from an assessment project. Faculty members playing such "games" consequently hamper productive use of assessment findings for institutional improvement. As a result, those charged with assessment must squarely address a key question: How does a campus effectively involve faculty in the assessment of student engagement to make both the assessment process and undergraduate education better? This article discusses four roles--source of data, audience, data analyst, and beneficiary of assessment knowledge--faculty can play in the assessment of student engagement on college and university campuses. (Contains 1 table.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Illinois; Iowa
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: National Survey of Student Engagement