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ERIC Number: EJ829957
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2009-Apr
Pages: 23
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0926-7220
Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory
Schulz, Roland M.
Science & Education, v18 n3-4 p1-23 Apr 2009
This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific "philosophy" of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate "visions" tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of "crisis-talk" and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education's growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan's cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science. (For part 1, see EJ829956.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Elementary Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A